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Facebook has a new logo! But what does this mean?

Facebook has a new logo! But what does this mean?

Facebook has a new logo and colour palette. This means wherever used, it will likely need updating across multiple platforms to keep in line with the new brand image.

Along with the changes, Facebook has launched an updated Brand Resource Centre that features downloadable logo assets as well as a PDF version of its identity guidelines.

While these guidelines aren’t “required”, following Facebook’s provided standards as much as possible can bring benefits to your branding since it creates a consistent and recognisable look that users will become familiar with as the new look rolls out more widely.

Here, we’ll break down each main element of Facebook’s branding and what the guidelines mean.

The new official “f”

Highly recognisable, Facebook’s ‘F icon is the main thing to have been refreshed. The new logo retains the distinctive letter “f” but replaces the rounded square container with a circle. The new-look moves the “f” to the centre of the icon, rather than slightly to the right side like in the previous version. This matches Facebook’s move towards the circular look of profile photos. Facebook have covered the do’s and don’ts within their brand resource here.

What this means:

  • Wherever you display the “f” icon, ideally it should be updated with the new version.
  • This includes, according to Facebook’s brand standards, any use of the “f” alone or the old version of the “f” inside a square with rounded corners.
  • Note that Facebook’s brand standards specifically say that the “f” should not be used alone either in its customised version of Freight Sans Pro or any other typeface.
  • You should never just type the “f” using the font as a way to attempt to recreate the logo. There have been spacing and other adjustments made to the design that means this won’t match exactly.
  • Facebook has switched to a brighter shade of blue, that should be used on the “f” icon. If the correct blue cannot be used, Facebook still allows for black or white variations.

The Iconic "thumbs up"

Facebook still allows you to use the iconic “thumbs up” icon “to represent the concept of ‘liking’ something on Facebook.” This mark does not replace ‘Like’ thumbs found in the Facebook product. This is the primary and approved ‘Thumb’ to use in your marketing.

What this means:

  • You should only use the Thumb Icon with a clear written call to action (for example: “Like us on Facebook”, “Install our app on Facebook”, “For use with Facebook”) to reference your Facebook presence.
  • Facebook says no other icons should be used when the thumb icon is used.
  • Don’t substitute the Thumb Icon for the word “like” in text.
  • Don’t modify the Thumb Icon in any way, such as by changing the design, scale or colour. If you can’t use the correct color due to technical limitations, use black and white.
  • The background colour should remain the brighter blue shade Facebook calls “reaction blue”, not the Facebook Blue 70.

The ‘Wordmark’

Facebook still uses the full logotype of its name, what it refers to as its “wordmark”. The Facebook wordmark represents the entire organisation, Facebook, Inc and the family of products and services. It is not interchangeable with the “f” Logo or ever used to represent facebook.com or the Facebook mobile app. Basically, this element should only be used when referring to the company as a whole.

What this means:

  • If you’re creating a graphic that relates to, for example, Facebook Inc.’s financial results, then the wordmark would be appropriate to use over the “f” icon.
  • However, if a graphic is focused on Facebook’s core social media service, facebook.com or the mobile app, then the “f” icon should likely be used instead.
  • It appears that Facebook seems to prefer the “f” icon, so if in doubt, you can either contact Facebook or, most likely, err on the side of using the “f” icon (it’s also worth noting the icon is much less complex and therefore easier to display prominently at many sizes).
  • The corporate logotype should maintain the company’s older, darker shade, what it calls “Facebook Blue 70.” However, Facebook seems to be contradicting their own rules by placing the ‘wordmark’, in the brighter side of blue on the latest version of its mobile apps, although this could be part of the brand transition.

According to reddit forums the logo seems at a glance slightly positioned to the left. I guess you could say it is, but only in comparison to the previous logo. In reality, the stem of the “f” is dead centered. Another thing people are picking up on is the inconsistency with the brand colours. Some places use the new “reaction blue”, while other elements are still coloured in “Facebook Blue 70”. We rather like the new brighter blue, so hope it will be rolled out across the whole organisation soon.

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